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 George Jones passes Away at 81

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MessageSujet: George Jones passes Away at 81   Sam 27 Avr 2013, 02:35

George Jones Dead at 81


Hall of Fame Member Regarded as One of Greatest Singers in American Music History
April 26, 2013; Written by Ronnie Pugh
George Jones, undisputedly one of the greatest singers in the history of American music, died Friday morning (April 26) at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville at age 81.

Jones announced in August 2012 that he planned to retire from touring in 2013. He had embarked on the farewell tour, but had been hospitalized since April 18 after being diagnosed with fever and irregular blood pressure.

Jones was one of the few surviving links to the fast-fading honky-tonk era of country's past. Inspired by the booze-soaked heartache of Hank Williams and Lefty Frizzell, Jones sang of his own life of joys and sorrows, hopes and fears, in a distinctive though oft-imitated voice whose talent amazed critics and fans and left Jones himself at a loss for words to explain. Whatever it was that Jones had, there aren't many country singers since who haven't wanted some of it. Ask Alan Jackson, Randy Travis, George Strait or any of a whole host of latter-day disciples.

George Glenn Jones was born Sept. 12, 1931, in a log cabin near Saratoga, Texas, in the heart of the oil-drilling country of Southeast Texas' heavily-wooded Big Thicket. Through music, a highly emotional and revivalistic religion and his own brand of drunken hell-raising, young Jones found solace from poverty and from the rampages of an alcoholic father. His family moved into government housing for a time, as he sang for pocket change on the street corners of Beaumont, Texas.

While still in his teens, Jones made his radio debut up the road a bit on station KTXJ in Jasper, Texas, though he soon came back to Beaumont for radio work on KRIC with a husband-and-wife team, Eddie & Pearl. At KRIC, he had his one brief encounter with his idol, Hank Williams, passing through town and plugging a show date on the air.

Jones married for the first of four times in 1950, but this union with Dorothy Bonvillion lasted barely more than a year when his drinking and temper drove them apart. He served in the Marine Corps during and after the Korean War years but kept his guitar handy at stateside posts. The late Bob Pinson, a country music scholar, recalled first seeing Jones as a singing Marine -- billed as Little Georgie Jones, the Foresters Hall Flash -- in California about 1953, singing very much in a Hank Williams style.

Fresh out of the military, Jones first recorded in 1954 for the new Houston independent label, Starday Records, a company named for its co-owners Jack Starnes and Harold W. "Pappy" Daily. Daily hitched his wagon to Jones' rising star, managing him, negotiating his deals and producing his records for Starday, Mercury, United Artists and Musicor all the way from the mid-1950s to 1970. It was Jones' own co-written "Why Baby Why" for Starday in 1955 that put him on the country music map. The song was successfully covered the next year by the field's biggest star, Webb Pierce, on a Decca duet with Red Sovine.

Despite a brief flirtation with rockabilly in 1956 under the pseudonym Thumper Jones, the country hits kept coming -- three more for Starday in 1956, at which point Daily took him over to Mercury without missing a beat. The biggest of his early Mercury hits were "Don't Stop the Music" (1957), "Color of the Blues" (1958), "Treasure of Love" (1958) and two wonderful novelties released in 1959 -- "White Lightning," written by J.P. Richardson (aka the Big Bopper) and "Who Shot Sam."

The early 1960s found Jones turning 30 and using a somewhat mellower voice and style, but the emotional wallop was still evident on a succession of Top 10 songs of heartbreak: "The Window Up Above," "Tender Years," "She Thinks I Still Care," "A Girl I Used to Know" and "You Comb Her Hair." Moving to the United Artists label in 1962 and Musicor in 1965, Jones proved he could still belt out a novelty hit, such as "Your Heart Turned Left (And I Was on the Right)" (1964), "The Race Is On" (1964), "Love Bug" (1965) and "I'm a People" (1966). Daily flew Jones and his Jones Boys band (which featured the fine vocal harmony of George Riddle and sometimes Johnny Paycheck) to Nashville for most of these and later sessions, and you can hear such Nashville Sound touches as string sections and the Jordanaires' vocal choruses on late-1960s Musicor hits like "Walk Through This World With Me" and "If My Heart Had Windows."

Distinctive as Jones' solo efforts were, his talents as a duet partner were also much in demand during the 1960s. It was a trail he blazed with Margie Singleton in 1961 and Melba Montgomery in 1963, though Jones and Montgomery never topped their incomparable first pairing, "We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds." Soon everyone -- including Jim Reeves and Dottie West, Bobby Bare and Skeeter Davis, and Ernest Tubb and Loretta Lynn -- seemed to be pairing up for duet hits. Jones soon added duet hits with pop singer Gene Pitney (1965-1966) and a memorable No. 12 hit with Brenda Carter, "Milwaukee Here I Come" in 1968 (their only charted duet).

Jones' 14-year second marriage to Texan Shirley Ann Corley ended with divorce in 1968, about the same time that the field's hottest female star, Tammy Wynette was going through her own second divorce (from Don Chapel) and a failing duet tandem with Epic Records labelmate David Houston. (Their only big hit was "My Elusive Dreams.")

Jones reportedly witnessed a fight between Wynette and Don Chapel and whisked Wynette and her daughters away in his own car. They married in February 1969 -- a country music marriage made in heaven between two major stars, soon referred to as the "President and First Lady."

Before long, Jones was also on the Epic label, and while he continued to have hits in his own right under Billy Sherrill's production, the spotlight for the six years of their marriage (1969-1975) and even beyond was on their duet hits. Fans will recall such classics as "The Ceremony" (1972), "We're Gonna Hold On" (1973), "(We're Not) The Jet Set" (1974), "We Loved It Away" (1974), "Golden Ring" (1976), "Near You" (1976-1977), "Southern California" (1977) and "Two Story House" (1980).

The George Jones-Tammy Wynette Show became the big-ticket package tour of the early 1970s, but it was their increasingly stormy home life that began to grab the headlines. At the time or through book and movie accounts later, the entire world became aware of Wynette's attempts to keep Jones off the bottle and Jones countering with that famous trip aboard his riding mower to the liquor store closest to their mansion in south Nashville.

In the years just after the 1975 divorce, Jones sank deeper into a welter of drink and drugs and legal and financial woes and won for himself the unenviable but unshakable moniker of "No-Show Jones" by missing dozens of scheduled performances. But like Hank Williams before him, the artistic genius never deserted him through all this adversity.

In 1980, at the very nadir of his troubles, he recorded "He Stopped Loving Her Today," which became his first million-seller and a multiple award winner. And it wasn't alone -- right after it came "I'm Not Ready Yet," "If Drinkin' Don't Kill Me (Her Memory Will)," "Still Doin' Time" and "I Always Get Lucky With You." But unlike Hank Williams, Jones was able to pull out of his personal nose dive, famously with the help of his fourth and final wife, Nancy Sepulvado, whom he married in 1983.

After more hits such as "Who's Gonna Fill Their Shoes," "Wine Colored Roses" and "The Right Left Hand" in the mid-1980s, Jones moved to MCA Records in 1990. Despite continued critical acclaim and a sobriety and reliability theretofore unheard of, Jones watched his MCA recordings largely disappear from the country charts, displaced by the many young turks he had so largely inspired. He complained of his eclipse in "I Don't Need Your Rocking Chair" and continued to work the road successfully and reap major career awards (capped by induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1992). But his mainstream radio banishment inexplicably continued, in spite of critical acclaim for new records on Asylum (Cold, Hard Truth in 1999) and a gospel package (The Gospel Collection: George Jones Sings the Greatest Story Ever Told) for BNA/Bandit.

Jones was seriously injured in a near-fatal car crash in 1999 when he totaled his car by ramming a bridge railing. (He had a bottle with him at the time but claimed sobriety.)

The world that shaped the incomparable voice and life of George Jones is gone, and country music will not see the like of it -- or him -- again.

He is survived by wife Nancy, whom he married in 1983, and several children and grandchildren, most of whom still live in the Nashville area where Jones himself lived after leaving Texas in the late 1960s.

Source:
http://www.cmt.com/news/country-music/1706378/george-jones-dead-at-81.jhtml

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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Sam 27 Avr 2013, 03:24


George Jones, country superstar, has died at 81
By HILLEL ITALIE and CHRIS TALBOTT | Associated Press –


NASHVILLE, TN - NOVEMBER 14: Singer/Songwriter George Jones and his NATD Award during the 2012 NATD Honors at The Hermitage Hotel on November 14, 2012 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Rick Diamond/Getty Images for Nashville Association of Talent Directors)


NASHVILLE, TN - NOVEMBER 14: Singer/Songwriter George Jones during the 2012 NATD Honors at The Hermitage Hotel on November 14, 2012 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Rick Diamond/Getty Images for Nashville Association of Talent Directors)

George Jones, the peerless, hard-living country singer who recorded dozens of hits about good times and regrets and peaked with the heartbreaking classic "He Stopped Loving Her Today," has died. He was 81.

Jones died Friday at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, according to his publicist Kirt Webster. He had been hospitalized with fever and irregular blood pressure, forcing him to postpone two shows.

With one of the most golden voices of any genre, a clenched, precise, profoundly expressive baritone, Jones had No. 1 songs in five separate decades, 1950s to 1990s. He was idolized not just by fellow country artists, but by Frank Sinatra, Pete Townshend, Elvis Costello, James Taylor and countless others. "If we all could sound like we wanted to, we'd all sound like George Jones," Waylon Jennings once sang.

Word of his death spread Friday morning as his peers paid tribute.

"The greatest voice to ever grace country music will never die," Garth Brooks said in an email to The Associated Press. "Jones has a place in every heart that ever loved any kind of music."

Ronnie Dunn added: "The greatest country blues singer to ever live."

In Jones' case, that's not hyperbole. In a career that lasted more than 50 years, "Possum" evolved from young honky-tonker to elder statesman as he recorded more than 150 albums and became the champion and symbol of traditional country music, a well-lined link to his hero, Hank Williams.

Jones survived long battles with alcoholism and drug addiction, brawls, accidents and close encounters with death, including bypass surgery and a tour bus crash that he only avoided by deciding at the last moment to take a plane.

His failure to appear for concerts left him with the nickname "No Show Jones," and he later recorded a song by that name and often opened his shows by singing it. His wild life was revealed in song and in his handsome, troubled face, with its dark, deep-set eyes and dimpled chin.

In song, he was rowdy and regretful, tender and tragic. His hits included the sentimental "Who's Gonna Fill Their Shoes," the foot-tapping "The Race is On," the foot-stomping "I Don't Need Your Rockin' Chair," the melancholy "She Thinks I Still Care," the rockin' "White Lightning," and the barfly lament "Still Doing Time." Jones also recorded several duets with Tammy Wynette, his wife for six years, including "Golden Ring," ''Near You," ''Southern California" and "We're Gonna Hold On." He also sang with such peers as Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard and with Costello and other rock performers.

But his signature song was "He Stopped Loving Her Today," a weeper among weepers about a man who carries his love for a woman to his grave. The 1980 ballad, which Jones was sure would never be a hit, often appears on surveys as the most popular country song of all time.

Jones won Grammy awards in 1981 for "He Stopped Loving Her Today" and in 1999 for "Choices." He was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1992 and in 2008 was among the artists honored in Washington at the Kennedy Center.

Jones continued to make appearances and put out records, though his hit records declined.

"I don't want to completely quit because I don't know what to do with myself," he said in 2005. "I'll be out there as long as the people want me to be out there."

He was in the midst of a yearlong farewell tour when he passed away. He was scheduled to complete the tour in November with an all-star packed tribute in Nashville.

Jones was a purist who lamented the transformation of country music from the family feeling of the 1950s to the hit factory of the early 21st century. He was so caught up in country, old country, that when a record company executive suggested he record with James Taylor, Jones insisted he had never heard of the million selling singer-songwriter. He was equally unimpressed when told that Neil Young had come to visit backstage and declined to see him, saying he didn't know who he was. He did listen to the Rolling Stones, only because of the guitar playing of Keith Richards, a country fan who would eventually record with Jones.

Asked about what he thought about Carrie Underwood, Taylor Swift and other young stars, Jones said they were good but they weren't making traditional country music.

"What they need to do really, I think, is find their own title," he said.

In 1991, country star Alan Jackson dedicated his hit song "Don't Rock the Jukebox" to Jones, asking in the song that country music remain faithful to the Jones style instead of drifting toward rock 'n' roll.

Jones was born Sept. 12, 1931, in a log house near the east Texas town of Saratoga, the youngest of eight children. He sang in church and at age 11 began performing for tips on the streets of Beaumont, Texas. His first outing was such a success that listeners tossed him coins, placed a cup by his side and filled it with money. Jones estimated he made more than $24 for his two-hour performance, enough to feed his family for a week, but he used up the cash at a local arcade.

"That was my first time to earn money for singing and my first time to blow it afterward," he recalled in "I Lived to Tell it All," a painfully self-critical memoir published in 1996. "It started what almost became a lifetime trend."

The family lived in a government-subsidized housing project, and his father, a laborer, was an alcoholic who would rouse the children from bed in the middle of the night to sing for him. His father also noted that young George liked music and bought him a Gene Autry guitar, with a horse and lariat on the front, that Jones practiced on obsessively.

He got his start on radio with husband and wife team Eddie & Pearl in the late 1940s. Hank Williams once dropped by the studio to promote a new record, and Jones was invited to back him on guitar. When it came time to play, he froze.

"Hank had 'Wedding Bells' out at the time," Jones recalled in a 2003 Associated Press interview. "He started singing it, and I never hit the first note the whole song. I just stared."

After the first of his four marriages failed, he enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1951 and served three years. He cut his first record when he got out, an original fittingly called "No Money in This Deal."

He had his first hit with "Why Baby Why" in 1955, and by the early '60s Jones was one of country music's top stars.

"I sing top songs that fit the hardworking, everyday loving person. That's what country music is about," Jones said in a 1991 AP interview. "My fans and real true country music fans know I'm not a phony. I just sing it the way it is and put feeling in it if I can and try to live the song."

Jones was married to Wynette, his third wife, from 1969 to 1975. (Wynette died in 1998.) Their relationship played out in Nashville like a country song, with hard drinking, fights and reconciliations. Jones' weary knowledge of domestic warfare was immortalized in such classics as "The Battle," set to the martial beat of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic."

After one argument, Jones drove off on a riding mower in search of a drink because Wynette had taken his car keys to keep him from carousing. Years earlier, married to his second wife, he had also sped off in a mower in search of a drink. Jones referred to his mowing days in the 1996 release, "Honky Tonk Song."

His drug and alcohol abuse grew worse in the late '70s, and Jones had to file for bankruptcy in 1978. A manager had started him on cocaine, hoping to counteract his boozy, lethargic performances, and Jones was eventually arrested in Jackson, Miss., in 1983 on cocaine possession charges. He agreed to perform a benefit concert and was sentenced to six months probation.

"In the 1970s, I was drunk the majority of the time," Jones wrote in his memoir. "If you saw me sober, chances are you saw me asleep."

In 1980, a 3-minute song changed his life. His longtime producer, Billy Sherrill, recommended he record "He Stopped Loving Her Today," a ballad by Curly Putnam and Bobby Braddock. The song took more than a year to record, partly because Jones couldn't master the melody, which he confused with Kris Kristofferson's "Help Me Make it Through the Night," and partly because he was too drunk to recite a brief, spoken interlude ("She came to see him one last time/And we all wondered if she would/And it kept running through my mind/This time he's over her for good.")

"Pretty simple, eh?" Jones wrote in his memoir. "I couldn't get it. I had been able to sing while drunk all of my life. I'd fooled millions of people. But I could never speak without slurring when drunk. What we needed to complete that song was the narration, but Billy could never catch me sober enough to record four simple spoken lines."

Jones was convinced the song was too "morbid" to catch on. But "He Stopped Loving Her Today," featuring a string section that hummed, then soared, became an instant standard and virtually canonized him. His concert fee jumped from $2,500 a show to $25,000.

"There is a God," he recalled.

In 1983, Jones married his fourth and final wife, Nancy Sepulveda, whom he credited with stablizing his private life. He had four children, one with first wife Dorothy Bonvillion, two with second wife Shirley Ann Corley and one with Wynette. His daughter with Wynette, Georgette Jones, became a country singer and even played her mother in the 2008 TV series "Sordid Lives."

___
Source:
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Sam 27 Avr 2013, 06:17


Little Richard (left) poses with Tammy Wynette and George Jones in 1972. (Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty

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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Sam 27 Avr 2013, 12:53

RIP
Respect, et merci baucoup.....
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Sam 27 Avr 2013, 14:47

Merci Elvire pour ce complèment
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Sam 27 Avr 2013, 16:04

thanks

The Late George Jones’s Infamous ‘Mower Saga’
.By Wendy Geller




The legendary George Jones, who passed away Friday at the age of 81, will be well remembered for his music--as well as the colorful stories that inspired it. Although perhaps best-loved for his aching tales of heartbreak, Jones also knew how to bring one heck of a funny story to life via song.

One of the best examples of this is 1996's "Honky Tonk Song," which relates the true story of what happened when a drunken Jones--who had a notorious alcoholic streak through much of his life--had his car keys taken away by his very fed-up wife back in in 1966.

As the story goes: The hard-living Jones had been drunk for several days, and his spouse at the time, Shirley Ann Corley, decided to physically restrain him from having any more liquor. She knew he was not in any shape to walk the eight miles into town, so before leaving the house herself one night, she hid every set of keys they owned…except one.

"I can vaguely remember my anger at not being able to find keys to anything that moved," Jones recalled in his 1997 autobiography I Lived To Tell It All.

However, he happened to look out the window, and his eyes fell on his ride-on lawn mower sitting in a beam of light shining over the property.

"A key glistened in the ignition," he remembered.

Jones wasted no time hopping on the mower, and took it all the way to town, despite the fact that its speed topped out at about 5 miles per hour.

"It might have taken an hour and a half or more for me to get to the liquor store, but get there I did," Jones related. "I wonder if the old timers around East Texas still wonder about a guy who they swear they saw mowing the concrete!"

Jones said that he was able to laugh at the story much later--and turn it into a tune featuring the hysterical lyrics "I saw those blue lights flashin'/Over my left shoulder/He walked right up and said/"Get off that riding mower"/I said "Sir, let me explain/ Before you put me in the tank/She took my keys away/And now she won't drive me to drink."

However: "Nobody was amused at the time," he admitted.

If the story seems too crazy to be true, Jones's third wife, fellow late country legend Tammy Wynette, told a similar story in her own 1979 autobiography--except in her version, she tracked the infamous lawn mower down at a bar a full 10 miles away from their house.

Jones became sober for good after surviving a drunken car crash in 1999. He credited his fourth wife, Nancy, with helping him achieve a clean lifestyle.

Source:
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Lun 29 Avr 2013, 14:08

George Jones funeral at Grand Ole Opry open to public

April 28, 2013, 6:40 PM EST
By Todd Cunningham
TheWrap


Country music icon George Jones' funeral will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursday at The Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville, Tenn., and will be open to the public.

Bing: More on George Jones

"George would have wanted his fans and friends everywhere to be able to come and pay their respects along with his family," said publicist Kirt Webster. The Country Music Hall of Famer, member of the Grand Ole Opry and Kennedy Center Honoree died Friday at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville at the age of 81.


Born Sept. 12, 1931, in Saratoga, Tex., Jones was one of the most influential singers in American popular music. His hits included "She Thinks I Still Care," "The Grand Tour," "Walk Through This World With Me," "Tender Years" and "He Stopped Loving Her Today." The latter song often tops lists of the greatest country music singles of all time.

"Thanks to George's friends, fans, and loved ones for the outpouring of love at this terrible time," said his wife Nancy Jones. "I love you all."

More: Five George Jones performances you must watch

A private visitation for family, friends, and fellow performers will take place on Wednesday evening.

In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that contributions be made to the Grand Ole Opry trust fund.

Source:
http://music.msn.com/music/article.aspx?news=804851
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Lun 29 Avr 2013, 17:26

George Jones "White lightning"

"
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Mar 30 Avr 2013, 10:54

Nous avons apris cette mauvaise nouvelle a Attignat.
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Mar 30 Avr 2013, 11:20

même moi j'ai un disque de lui (le 25cm de chez Ace) et pourtant je ne suis pas un grand fan de country
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Jeu 02 Mai 2013, 13:09

Music City mourns country legend George Jones


Associated Press/Mark Humphrey, file - FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2007 file photo, George Jones is shown in Nashville, Tenn. A funeral service for Jones will take place on Thursday, May 2, 2013 at The Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville. Jones, the peerless, hard-living country singer who recorded dozens of hits about good times and regrets and peaked with the heartbreaking classic "He Stopped Loving Her Today," died April 26, 2013 at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. He was 81. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, file)


A wreath in memory of country music star George Jones hangs on a door at the Grand Ole Opry House on Wednesday, May 1, 2013, in Nashville, Tenn. The Opry House is where the funeral for Jones will be held Thursday, May 2. Jones, one of country music's biggest stars who had No. 1 hits in four separate decades, died April 26. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)


Jean Tanner, of Madison, Ga., walks past a wreath hung on a door at the Grand Ole Opry House in memory of country music star George Jones on Wednesday, May 1, 2013, in Nashville, Tenn. The Opry House is where the funeral for Jones will be held Thursday, May 2. Jones, one of country music's biggest stars who had No. 1 hits in four separate decades, died April 26. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)


People visit the the Grand Ole Opry House on Wednesday, May 1, 2013, in Nashville, Tenn. The Opry House is where the funeral for country music legend George Jones will be held Thursday, May 2. Jones, one of country music's biggest stars who had No. 1 hits in four separate decades, died April 26. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Thousands of fans are expected to join some of country music's biggest stars in mourning George Jones.

The late country music superstar's funeral will be held Thursday morning at the Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville, Tenn. Jones died last week at 81.

Former first lady Laura Bush will speak at the funeral along with friends and fellow country stars Barbara Mandrell and Kenny Chesney. Jones also will be serenaded by Brad Paisley, Alan Jackson, Tanya Tucker, Wynonna Judd, Charlie Daniels and Randy Travis, who were all scheduled perform at the public memorial with several others.

The funeral will be broadcast live on cable music television channels CMT and GAC and — in a nod to simpler times when Jones was at his biggest — on all local television networks.

He was in the midst of a farewell tour that was to have wrapped up with an all-star salute in November in Nashville. He postponed two performances two weeks ago and entered the hospital with a fever and irregular blood pressure. He'd been ill off and on over the previous year.

Jones' pure, matchless baritone defined the sound of country music for a half century and his death brought universal reaction from the music community and fans. Known for hits like "Who's Gonna Fill Their Shoes," ''White Lightning" and "He Stopped Loving Her Today," widely acknowledged as the greatest country song, Jones had No. 1s in four decades from the 1950s to the 1980s and "Possum" remained a popular figure in Music City until his death.

Once married to Tammy Wynette, he was the living embodiment of the words "country music star" at the height of his career and continues to have broad influence on the genre, especially with artists who prefer traditional country to today's pop- and rock-influenced sounds.

Jones also had his troubles as he battled substance abuse and money troubles, but always seemed to slide by with his sense of humor and knowing grin intact.

He won a Grammy and two consecutive Country Music Association song of the year awards for "He Stopped Loving Her Today," and was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1992. He was among the artists honored in Washington at the Kennedy Center in 2008.

The Beaumont, Texas, native had been a member of the Grand Ole Opry since 1956, which makes the setting of Thursday's ceremony all the more fitting. The Opry House holds more than 4,000 people and was expected to be filled beyond capacity.

Source:
http://music.yahoo.com/news/music-city-mourns-country-legend-george-jones-092652443.html
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Jeu 02 Mai 2013, 14:06

Le service pour George Jones sera diffuse en direct a 10H (central time) sur WSMonline.com (7 heures de decalage avec la France)... 17H en France

Friends and fans remember the great George Jones, who passed away in Nashville on Friday, April 26, 2013.

The funeral service for George Jones will be held at the Grand Ole Opry House and will be open to the public. Fans can also watch a live stream of the service on this page today starting at 10 am CT or listen live at wsmonline.com and on the Opry app.

In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that contributions be made to the Opry Trust Fund or to the Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum. Click here for more details.

Source:
http://www.opry.com/georgejones/
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Mer 20 Nov 2013, 05:49

George Jones Monument Unveiled On Monday In Nashville

A monument to the late, great George Jones was unveiled yesterday Woodlawn Roesch-Patton Funeral Home and Memorial Park in Nashville, Tennessee.

The unveiling was open to the public, and featured a special announcement from the Country legend's widow Nancy Jones.

George Jones passed away April 26 of this year. He will be saluted by a wide variety of stars from across and beyond the Country Music genre on November 22 at the sold-out tribute event The Final NO SHOW, for which the full talent list was recently released.



Source:
http://www.roughstock.com/blog/george-jones-monument-unveiled-on-monday-in-nashville
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Mer 20 Nov 2013, 18:56

Emouvant ... Il aura marqué son public
R.I.P
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MessageSujet: Re: George Jones passes Away at 81   Jeu 21 Nov 2013, 02:32

J'aurais eu la chance de le voir au Ryman Auditorium à Nashville en 1997 ! soleil5 
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